Get a Quote
0

Adidas to Use Only Recycled Plastics in Shoes and Clothing AND They’re Cutting it Out of Their Offices Too!

Adidas recently announced it is committing to making its products more sustainable by using only recycled plastic by 2024. The pledge includes polyester, a material which is now exceedingly popular in the production of sportswear and clothing in general. The move, coming from one of the biggest names in the sportswear market, has a great chance to influence other companies to follow the lead. Besides eliminating “virgin” plastic from its products, Adidas will stop using the material in offices, retail outlets, warehouses, and distribution centers, CNN Money reports. The move is estimated to save 40 tons of plastic per year, starting in 2018. According to the company, Adidas’s spring and summer apparel line for 2019 will already contain around 41 percent recycled polyester. The sportswear maker is also expecting an increase in sales of their Parley shoes, which are made from plastic intercepted before it reaches the oceans and created in collaboration with the organization Parley for the Oceans. The sales are estimated to reach 5 million pairs this year, compared with 1 million in 2017. Adidas is the latest major company to implement changes aiming to reduce the amount of plastic used by the business. Most recently, moves targeting plastic waste have been announced by McDonald’s, Starbucks, American Express, and IKEA. It is so great to see companies stepping up to eliminate this harmful material from everyday items. It’s estimated that around 85 percent of the world’s plastic never gets recycled, and we dump 8.8 million tons of plastics into the oceans every single year. Each of us can play a small part in making a change and reducing plastic pollution for the benefit of our planet. To find out what you can do, check out One Green Planet’s #CrushPlastic campaign. Orginal Source

0

Government funds St Helena plastics scheme

The project is part of a package of funding and support for UK Overseas Territories announced by the Government At the same time, the Darwin Plus scheme opens today for the latest round of applications to fund conservation and environmental projects in UK Overseas Territories. Around £3 million is available. Darwin Plus will deliver on commitments set out in the 25 Year Environment Plan in UK Overseas Territories around the globe. St Helena is an island located in the South Atlantic Ocean with an estimated population of around 4,550. According to Defra, the new scheme on St Helena will aim to reduce the amount of plastic used by those living on the island and will establish a recycling programme for waste plastic. As part of the project, a marine debris monitoring programme will be established along St Helena’s coastline to “better understand” this issue. Local school children and communities will be engaged in the project through an educational outreach programme, Defra said. 'Crucial activities’ Commenting on the funding package, environment secretary, Michael Gove said: “We must protect our oceans and marine life from plastic waste if we are to be the first generation to leave our environment in a better state than we found it. “Protecting and enhancing biodiversity in the UK’s Overseas Territories will help to make crucial activities such as agriculture, fisheries, forestry and tourism more sustainable.” Plastic pollution in the South Atlantic Ocean could threaten St Helena’s “huge array of fish and marine life,” along with coral ecosystems, Defra said. During June, the St Helena National Trust Marine Team and the St Helena Government Marine Section and four Prince Andrew School students walked to Sharks Valley on the island for a beach clean-up. “More than 1,000 plastic bottles, 1,540 pieces of polystyrene, 50 fishing buoys/floats and 124 flip–flops and shoes were collected by the volunteers,” Defra reports. Orginal Source

0

Rise of the Electric Vehicles

, Rapid rise of UK electric vehicles sees National Grid double its 2040 forecast, rapid-rise-of-uk-electric-vehicles-sees-national-grid-double-its-2040-forecast, That’s according to the latest National Grid Future Energy Scenarios, published today. Yet despite raising electricity demand, National Grid now says the rapid rise of Electric Vehicles (EVs) will help the UK shift towards more renewable and low-carbon electricity generation, Smart charging and vehicle-to-grid technology means EVs will be able to help smooth electricity usage through the hours of the day, National Grid says. They will be able to charge mainly when demand is low and even feed back into the grid when demand is high. “Growth in EVs supports the continued trend towards more low-carbon generation,” says National Grid. “[They] will be able to support the continued growth in renewables by storing excess generation and releasing it back onto the network when it is needed.” Future energy scenarios Each year, National Grid publishes a set of four scenarios for the UK’s future energy supply and demand built around the company’s own modelling and consultation with the energy community. The scenarios help the company plan for an uncertain – but rapidly changing – energy system. This year’s scenarios include a stronger focus on the UK’s transition to low-carbon. “We’ve refreshed our scenario framework to reflect the increasing importance of decentralisation and decarbonisation in our industry,” Slye writes. Nevertheless, only two of the four scenarios meet the UK’s legally binding greenhouse gas emissions target for 2050 – an 80% cut on 1990 levels. This target is likely to be raised in response to the 2015 Paris Agreement. These points form important context for National Grid’s conclusions. In previous years, only one of the four scenarios met the UK’s 2050 target. Twice as many EVs One of the most striking changes in this year’s scenarios is the much more rapid adoption of EVs. Between 2013 and 2015, National Grid consistently said there would be around 5m EVs on UK roads by 2035. It raised that 2035 outlook to 8m in its 2016 work, rising to 10m in 2040, as Carbon Brief reported at the time. The outlook grew again last year to 13m in 2035 and 17m in 2040. This year, National Grid says there could be up to 25m EVs by 2035 and 36m by 2040, effectively doubling its outlook from last year. The figures represent a tripling compared to 2016’s figures and a five-fold increase from the 2015 numbers. By 2040, National Grid now says EVs will reach saturation point, with all possible vehicles electrified and new EVs replacing old ones as they retire. Orginal Source

0

Michael Gove pledges high environmental standards post-Brexit

The UK Environment Secretary said future trade deals would not involve a “race to the bottom”, while a new environmental governance body with “considerable teeth” would be set up to hold ministers to account. And he insisted Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, as “equal partners” in the UK, would be fully involved in the new arrangements. Giving evidence to the Environment Committee via video link, Mr Gove said: “The involvement of the devolved administrations in making sure that we get the right trade deal is central. “We have been clear at a UK Government level… we absolutely need to maintain high environmental standards, and for that matter high animal welfare standards, in any trade deal that we conclude. “There is no future for the United Kingdom in trying to lead some sort of race to the bottom, the future for us economically is being the home of quality, whether that’s in the food and drink that we produce, or also in areas like for example ultra-low emission vehicles.” He said a new environmental watchdog would be established to uphold standards, and replicate functions currently carried out by the European Commission and European Court of Justice. “We think it will have considerable teeth, it will have the capacity to enforce compliance with the law,” he said. “Ultimately it would have the power to take the government to court.” Mr Gove said the body could operate on a UK-wide basis, or separate devolved organisations could be established. “I am open completely to thinking from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland about how our shared commitment to these principles (on environmental standards) and to how appropriate governance should be given effect at a devolved level,” he said. Orginal Source

0

Ministers meet to discuss UK-Wide deposit return scheme

Plans for a DRS have been gaining momentum in recent months, with Environment Secretary Michael Gove announcing that England would see a DRS introduced later this year – although this was later revised to 2020 – after Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon had committed to a DRS in Scotland back in September 2017. The Welsh Government has also suggested that it would explore the introduction of a DRS in Wales. The UK currently uses around 13 billion single-use plastic bottles a year, three billion of which end up being incinerated, sent to landfill or littered, finding their way into the countryside and the marine environment, while the recycling rate for plastic bottles has plateaued at 57 per cent for the past five years. While the devolved administrations are looking at introducing separate DRS, critics have stated that any DRS would need to be UK-wide to avoid issues such as fraud: containers could be brought across the border between Wales and England, for example, and have their deposits redeemed in England without having paid them in the first place. A system that is consistent across the entire UK has been suggested as a way to mitigate against such issues and provide consistency, clearing up confusion for consumers. As such, ministers charged with the environment portfolio in their respective administrations met on Friday to discuss a UK-wide DRS – except Northern Ireland, which sent representatives but is currently without a government following the breakdown of the power-sharing arrangement in January 2017. In attendance were UK Resources Minister Thérèse Coffey, Welsh Environment Minister Hannah Blythyn and Scottish Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham, who all expressed support for a UK-wide system and agreed to work together on a scheme’s design and operation. Speaking before the meeting, Thérèse Coffey said: “We are leading the way in reducing plastic pollution to protect our planet, with a clear commitment to introduce a deposit return scheme subject to consultation. “This summit is an excellent opportunity to deliver a coordinated approach with our colleagues in the devolved administrations who share our ambition to improve recycling and tackle the problem of plastics in our environment.” Following the summit, Hannah Blythyn added: “We know about the impact single-use drinks containers are having on our environment, often blighting our countryside or ending up in our seas. “I welcome working with the other UK nations on a UK-wide deposit return scheme. There appears to be a collective appetite for a scheme from all UK nations, so this would be the most practical and effective way to implement a scheme. “We are considering a number of solutions to reducing the impact of single-use plastics on our environment in Wales. Any scheme we introduce must be the best for Wales and work alongside our existing policies, which have made us first in the UK and third in the world for household recycling.” A DRS sees consumers pay a small fee when buying a product, which can later be redeemed upon the return of that product for recycling. While the exact designs of any DRS for Scotland and England are currently subject to consultation, they would target drinks containers made from plastic and possibly also those made of glass and metal. Orginal Source

0

EDF Energy announces second price rise this year

Dual fuel customers will have to pay 6% more for their gas and electricity from 31st August, increasing bills to £1,128 a year. The standard variable electricity and gas tariffs will rise by 6.1% and 6% respectively. The Big Six supplier said wholesale prices have increased by 13% since April, when it announced its previous price rise that came into effect last month. It added that is due to a number of factors, including the ‘Beast from the East’ reducing gas storage stocks over the winter, compounded by global oil markets feeding into higher UK wholesale energy prices. The price rise will affect around 40% or 1.3 million customers and those on fixed, prepayment or the safeguard tariffs will not see any changes. Managing Director Beatrice Bigois said: “We know that another price rise will not be welcome and we had hoped that our limited changes announced in April would be enough. However, energy costs have continued to rise significantly and despite our best efforts to absorb some of these by reducing the costs within our control – sadly we can no longer sustain this. “Customers who wish to avoid this increase will be encouraged to choose one of our fixed price tariffs when we write to them later this month.”