Get a Quote
0

Compostable cups get green light for composting sites

Cups will qualify if milk or cream fit for human consumption is the only animal by-product present, and the packaging holds a valid compostability certificate from an independent certification body. The news has been announced by the REA’s Organics Recycling Group, following talks with the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA), Environment Agency and Scottish Environment Protection Agency. It was facilitated by Edinburgh-based Vegware, which specialises in plant-based compostable foodservice packaging According to Charlie Trousdell, chair of the Organics Recycling Group, the initiative is aimed at the commercial sector where a company sells certified compostable packaging to a restaurant, café or similar. Examples of facility types that can compost the certifiable compostable material types using a suitable environmental authorisation include open-air turned windrow and outdoor static aerated pile systems. According to Vegware, the move “dramatically increases” the number of facilities allowed to process compostable drinks containers. And, it adds to the 53 in-vessel composting (IVC) facilities licensed to process food waste, Vegware reports. In the wake of the announcement, Mr Trousdell emphasised the need for a “joined up” approach between the seller of the packaging, businesses using the packaging, collection companies and the composter. He said this will give the composter “confidence that the café only places the finished coffee/drinks cups (and other approved waste) in the compostable bag. Orginal Source

0

Supermarket switch own-brand water to 50% recycled plastic bottles

The new bottles will have a cloudier and greyer appearance than those that do not contain recycled plastic and the Co-op said it accepted that they could test shoppers’ environmentally conscious credentials. The new bottles, which are 100% recyclable and sourced in the UK, will be in stores later this year. The supermarket has estimated that the change to all of its own-brand still, sparkling and flavoured water bottles will save almost 350 tonnes of plastic every year. It has also said it plans to rid its aisles of black and dark coloured plastic by 2020 because it is harder to detect by sorting machines due to its pigment and contaminates the recycling stream, reducing the usefulness and value of the recovered material. Co-op Food’s chief executive, Jo Whitfield, said: “Our customers expect us to respond to this challenge and help them make more ethical choices, and we’re dedicated to doing just that. Orginal Source

0

Eleven-year-old girl's groundbreaking invention could help reduce food waste

Rumaan Malik, a pupil at Grasby All Saints Primary School in Lincolnshire, invented a fruit bowl called the "Alarm Cup" that alerts its owner when food is about to expire. The innovative device scooped Ocado’s Food Waste Challenge award, which has seen the online grocer partner up with design website, Little Inventors. Some £13bn-worth of food is binned every year in Britain. Rumaan said: "I started thinking about what we throw away at home and what would help us stop this happening. Apples are my favourite fruit, but they were always going all soft when my mum left them out in the fruit bowl and forgot about them. "That’s when I thought of my idea and started drawing the Alarm Cup. I thought that we all need something that could help us use up our fruit by sounding an alarm before it goes off, instead of letting it end up in the bin. I couldn’t believe it when my teacher told me I had won!" Rumaan’s “Alarm Cup" also features a mini touchscreen display with icons for different produce, and food waste-fighting recipes such as apple crumble and banana bread. Helen White, special advisor on household food waste at WRAP, said: “We were particularly impressed by Rumaan’s invention as it addresses one of the key reasons food ends up in the bin: not using it in time. Even if we understand the difference between date labels, we can still struggle to use what we’ve bought. Orginal Source

0

Unilever has launched a range of beauty products housed in 100% post-consumer recycled (PCR) plastic bottles

The company announced that it would roll out its Love Beauty and Planet (LBP) line - which includes a range of face masks, shampoos, conditioners and shower gels - in the UK earlier this week, after its fully-recycled and 100% recyclable packaging proved popular among millennials in North America. The launch of the LBP products falls under Unilever’s Sustainable Living division, which aims to integrate sustainability into the group's products and values, according to the company’s vice president of beauty and personal care for the UK and Ireland, Chris Barron. "LBP reflects our passion at Unilever to enable everyone to live more sustainably and consciously by highlighting the simple steps we can all take to help make a better future for our planet," said Barron. “We have never been more aware of the need to be more responsible in the choices we make, even for something as simple as which shampoo we choose to use, so we are delighted to have embarked on this exciting journey. I believe that together, we truly can help make a genuine impact, whilst making the world a more beautiful place.” Orginal Source

0

Coca-Cola Great Britain has announced a partnership with Merlin Entertainments, to offer people 50% off entry

This comes following research by Coca-Cola Great Britain, revealing 64% of Brits would recycle more on-the-go if they were rewarded instantly for their actions.

0

National campaign challenging ‘careful littering’ launched in Manchester

More than a quarter of people admit to “careful littering” such as leaving drinks cans or coffee cups on window ledges, polling has found. A new campaign to stop people leaving food packaging behind them on a park bench when eating or drinking “on the go” or at a train station or bus stop before boarding has been launched, reminding the public it is still littering. The campaign to tackle careful littering is being rolled out after a survey of 2,143 people for Keep Britain Tidy by YouGov revealed that 27% admitted to this type of littering. It is being launched in Manchester following a successful pilot conducted by Keep Britain Tidy and supported by the People’s Postcode Lottery, which placed signs in places where rubbish is commonly left. A series of posters and floor vinyls were developed to tackle the moment when people might carefully place litter on the ground or a surface before walking away and leaving it. They offer people a reminder that, whether it is “carefully” placed or simply thrown on the floor, it is still littering. The trial took place in town centres, bus stops and parks across the country and saw the total amount of litter reduced by a fifth (20%), while in some areas, the reduction was up to 57%. Of the 1,072 people polled by Keep Britain Tidy in the trial areas, nearly two-thirds (63%) said the campaign would stop them leaving litter behind again. Allison Ogden-Newton, chief executive of Keep Britain Tidy, said: “We all need to care for the environment on our doorstep to reduce litter and, as a result, help tackle plastic pollution, which is doing so much damage to our marine environment. “This campaign shows it is possible to make a huge difference to the amount of litter left behind by people. “By highlighting that placing a coffee cup on a shop window sill is just as bad as mindlessly throwing litter on the ground is clearly making people think twice and to do it less. “With more than one in four people admitting to ‘careful’ littering, this campaign is a simple and effective way to get the message across to them in the place and at the moment when they’re likely to do it.” Orginal Source