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Edinburgh hotel has become the first in the UK to be battery-powered.

The Gyle Premier Inn at Edinburgh Park has installed a five-tonne battery which will charge from the national grid during off-peak periods and power the 200-room site for several hours each day. The 3m3 lithium ion battery is expected to save the hotel £20,000 a year on its energy bill, and is able to power the whole venue, including the restaurant, for up to three hours at a time after a two-hour charge. Premier Inn’s parent company Whitbread said the trial of the battery storage technology will help its commitment to halve its carbon emissions by 2025. Cian Hatton, Whitbread’s head of energy and environment, said: “Batteries are of course everyday items, more commonly associated with powering small household goods like the TV remote control, so it’s incredibly exciting to launch the UK’s first battery-powered hotel – an innovation which will save money, ensure security of supply and support the transition to a more flexible grid.” The hotel chain joins companies including B&Q , who installed lithium ion battery power systems in 2018. Electricity company E.ON has supplied and installed the technology at the hotel and will be remotely managing the battery’s workload and efficiency from its energy management center in Glasgow. Orginal Source

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Strategy ‘will require’ separate food waste collection

Collections Despite the big announcement, which is expected to divide opinion across the sector, Mr Stuart gave away few details in terms of the timeframe for the new policy. And, he also made no comment on whether food waste collections would have any knock-on effect on the frequency of residual waste collections. Addressing delegates at the conference, Mr Stuart said: “The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs will shortly launch its Resources and Waste Strategy. It sets our objective to maximise the value we get from our resources while minimising the negative impacts of waste materials at the end of their working lives. “It tackles long-standing issues like waste crime, collection systems, packaging and plastic pollution, including requiring, requiring, separate food waste collections.” Mr Stuart continued: “That’s a big step change and I know the industry will respond to this opportunity to develop the infrastructure we will need to ensure this separated waste stream is utilised.” Industry And, in terms of the AD industry, Mr Stuart said the Government understands that it offers “remarkable possibilities” for the UK’s future. And, he added: “Few industries in the UK can boast such a combination of advantages for the environment, for our economy and need for international development”. Defra’s waste strategy is expected to be published in the coming weeks, however, the department’s stance on separate waste collections has been uncertain up until this point. Orginal Source

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Convenience is key to a successful deposit return scheme (DRS) in the UK, according to RECOUP.

Research undertaken by the charity showed 56% of consumers either wouldn’t travel or travel more than a mile to return empty containers, with only 14% being prepared to travel more than three miles. RECOUP therefore predicted kerbside schemes would continue to be used as the primary collection scheme for drinks containers by some consumers. Almost 60% of consumers said 10p was enough of a deposit to get them to return drinks containers. The research showed ‘away from home’ locations can collect more material for recycling, with just 29% of consumers currently recycling on-the-go as well as in the home. Many said they connected getting their deposit back where they did their main food shopping. RECOUP has an active DRS Development Working Group made up of RECOUP Board Trustees that represent multiple sectors in the plastics packaging collection and recycling value chain Steve Morgan, co-ordinator of the RECOUP DRS Development Working Group, said: “Deposit Return Schemes will have a major role to play to enable consumers to understand the value of their used drinks containers. "A well-designed scheme can only be an effective mechanism to transform collections if it is part of a wider recycling collection infrastructure, including kerbside, bring, HWRC and ‘Away from Home’ collection points” Orginal Source

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So you already have a reusable bag but there are other ways to help the environment.

There's a lot of focus on how we can all do more as individuals, so here are Newsbeat's tips on how to be an eco-friendly shopper (and no, you don't have to be vegan). Bring your own bottle BYOB is not just for parties. Some supermarkets are encouraging customers to bring their own containers. Morrisons and Tesco offer shoppers the option to have raw meat and fish weighed at the counter which can then be placed into their own containers. Tesco is also trialling in-store recycling machines which will pay customers for every plastic bottle returned. In September, Lidl announced it would no longer be using black plastic for its fruit and veg range. Black plastic can't be easily scanned by recycling machines, which makes the process complicated. It's not just the major retailers doing their bit. Local stores like The Clean Kilo supermarket in Digbeth, Birmingham class themselves as "zero-waste supermarkets" hoppers bring in their own containers, which could be "an old margarine tub or an old washing up liquid bottle" says co-founder Tom Pell. Containers can be filled with products like pasta, cereals, rice and crisps. Your shopping is weighed and customers are charged accordingly. Tom says shoppers should try to choose items with recyclable packaging. "Quite often you'll get biscuits that are individually wrapped and have another big wrapper around them and then come in a multi-pack. It's those situations where it's almost ridiculous," he tells Newsbeat. Do you need a receipt? Many shops are no longer automatically tearing off a receipt at the till. Now, you're often asked if you actually need a receipt. Proof of purchase is obviously necessary for those panic buys during lunch breaks that need to be returned. But lots of high street stores now give the option to have a receipt emailed instead of a printed one. Some stores do still automatically roll out extra long receipts or multiple receipts including offers and vouchers. It's a lot of paper, which often goes to waste and some of it is not recyclable. Thermal receipts are the ones on shiny paper which is coated with a substance called bisphenol A (BPA) or alternatively BPS. Both substances have been banned from other plastic products because they can be harmful when ingested in large amounts. Thermal receipts end up in the bin because they can't be recycled. How far has your food travelled? Food miles is the distance food has traveled to get to your plate. The further food has traveled, the greater the impact on the environment. This is because of the pollution from carbon dioxide emissions, which comes from the vehicles transporting the food. Buying food from stores which stock products from local farmers can keep your food mileage down.Should you stay or should you go? One way to cut down the mileage when you're shopping, is to stay indoors. Online shopping eliminates car trips and carbon emissions by using one delivery van for multiple shoppers. But.... ....anyone who's ordered clothes online will know, many parcels arrive as a plastic bag. Inside, each item is usually individually wrapped in another plastic bag. The package will also contain a large, often A4, paper receipt with various thermal labels. You've probably noticed there'll also be other papers thrown in - promotional flyers, offers, samples, etc. Green is the new black Instead of buying new clothes, think about second hand options and recycling your unwanted outfits. Orginal Source

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How one company eliminated food waste: 'The landfill can no longer be an option'

Those carrot tops you’ve lopped off are not garbage. Your snapped-off green-bean stems are not scraps. They are what Thomas McQuillan, sustainability director for Baldor, a specialty foods and produce distributor, calls sparcs - “scraps” spelled backward and pronounced like “sparks.” And sparcs, despite popular assumption, are often just as edible as the rest of the fruit or vegetable. “The narrative around food that we don’t traditionally eat is all negative,” said McQuillan, whether it is the recently in vogue “ugly” produce or the yuck-inducing name “trash cooking.” “Instead of calling this trim or byproduct, let’s come up with a name for it.” It worked for the slimehead, a fish we now see on restaurant menus as orange roughy. It worked for Archibald Alexander Leach - you probably knew him as Cary Grant. And McQuillan is hoping the re-branding effort will make a dent in this country’s huge problem with food waste. It’s already working at Baldor. The company, which provides produce and specialty goods such as caviar and olive oil to the mid-Atlantic and north east’s food-service industry, no longer produces any organic food waste as of this year, thanks to some clever reuse initiatives. For the company’s Fresh Cuts programme, which offers pre-sliced, diced or otherwise prepared vegetables, Baldor saves all of its sparcs (though the company stylises it with a capital C, “SparCs,” to “help make the word stand out,” McQuillan said) for human or animal consumption. Previously, these edible and nutritious pieces of fruits and vegetables would have been discarded. Orginal Source

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Pringles cans can now be recycled in the UK

From December 2018, empty Pringles cans can be sent to TerraCycle using freepost labels in return for a charitable donation which can be redeemed at schools, charities or non-profits. Cans are then recycled with the resulting pellets used to create new products such as benches and fence posts. Pringles cans are not currently able to be recycled in the UK due to the complicated mixture of materials the product is made from. Kellogg’s has also launched a project to change its cereal pouches to a recycle-ready material by late 2019. This is estimated to remove 480 tonnes of non-recyclable packaging from its British and European supply chains every year. The cereal brand will also aim to make its packaging 100% reusable, recyclable or compostable by the end of 2025. Orginal Source